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* February 27, 2018, 07:08:29 AM
I have found a few issues that would be nice to have addressed in future versions.
You create a new structure with a basement and floor with a base elevation of 8". Use detail rectangle to create base size. Convert to walls. Next, copy the walls to first floor. Now create floor cut out for half the floor. Next create a topography line about 20' from the house at 10" elevation. When you do a walk through, the grass is visible in the cut out area.
Wall base boards extend to the end of the wall. This should not happen when the wall is intersecting another wall. The base board should stop at the intersection. It should also stop at door casings. It does not. I think it would almost be better to have the base board and crown moulding as an object where we could place them where required and set elevations.
Ceiling heights should also be set by elevation instead of the shortest wall.
Often, when you have a large opening, you may need to use a 1/8 Wall to cover the floor in an opening between floors. I know you can do the other ways such as using floor tool, but the colors do not blend. This method means you have to turn off ceiling and create your own.

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February 27, 2018, 08:29:53 AM
#1
Hi there,

You create a new structure with a basement and floor with a base elevation of 8". Use detail rectangle to create base size. Convert to walls. Next, copy the walls to first floor. Now create floor cut out for half the floor. Next create a topography line about 20' from the house at 10" elevation. When you do a walk through, the grass is visible in the cut out area.
If the grass appears while you are moving, this is the correct visualization => during the movement stage, all the components are in preparation mode and when you release the mouse button, you can see the finished rendering. If the grass appears all the time, then the walls in the perimeter are not perfectly fussed.

Wall base boards extend to the end of the wall. This should not happen when the wall is intersecting another wall. The base board should stop at the intersection. It should also stop at door casings. It does not.
This is not accurate. If a wall intersects another wall, the baseboard stops. The same happens with a door casing. See "Baseboards" image attached. Important: in order to avoid mistakes, when you apply textures, trims, colors, etc. be aware of the different SmartWand modes.

Ceiling heights should also be set by elevation instead of the shortest wall.
TFP includes 2 types of floors, ceilings, roofs, decks, etc: The Automatic Components, with their own rules and the Custom components where you can determine the settings. Automatic ceilings follow the shortest wall rule (IMO, this is great because you always know that there won't be holes between the walls and ceilings). Manual ceilings can be partial, full, elevated or not as well as hidden.

Often, when you have a large opening, you may need to use a 1/8 Wall to cover the floor in an opening between floors. I know you can do the other ways such as using floor tool, but the colors do not blend. This method means you have to turn off ceiling and create your own.
Not sure what do you mean? If the walls are perfectly aligned (this is very important), there is no gap as you can see in the image "Walls 2 levels" attached. If you are using  a Floor Cutout, notice that the elevation and thickness of the cutout must be the same elevation and thickness of the floor / ceiling.

TFP, as any program, has a learning curve. The best way to learn the program, IMO, is practice + practice + practice => Read and follow the manual (this is important), see the videos => try to create elements not related with your project, so you will become familiar with the commands and how to develop the different components.
If you are interested, I have several training e-books, one of them is free. See links in my signature.

Hope this helps.


* February 27, 2018, 09:31:27 AM
#2
Quote
If the grass appears while you are moving, this is the correct visualization => during the movement stage, all the components are in preparation mode and when you release the mouse button, you can see the finished rendering. If the grass appears all the time, then the walls in the perimeter are not perfectly fussed.
I understand what is happening. If you remove the topography line, no grass appears when moving. You can move through the cutout and no grass appears between the floor and ceiling either.
Quote
Not sure what do you mean? If the walls are perfectly aligned (this is very important), there is no gap as you can see in the image "Walls 2 levels" attached. If you are using  a Floor Cutout, notice that the elevation and thickness of the cutout must be the same elevation and thickness of the floor / ceiling.
Where walls are stacked, there is not issue. It is when a wall area includes the floor above that is the issue. In the photos below, that large opening hase a wall on the lower leverl that is topped by floor. Both floor and wall are the same color. The do not match unless I create a wall on the second level to cover the floor opeing. It does not mater whether you expose floor or floor cutout. I matches using this method.
In the second image for the basement opening, you can see the wall in the right mathes fine. On the left, you have the floor side on top of the lower level wall. No match. I correct this by adding a 12" wall 1/8" thick to cover the floor side and matching to the wall below. Then the mistach disapears.
The ceiling in the large room is manual.

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February 27, 2018, 09:44:42 AM
#3
Topo: Of course, if you don't have topo lines the grass won't appear.  ;)
 What I am saying is that if you have topo lines, building pads, slopes, excavations, etc, while you move, is preparation stage and as the program doesn't know the future conditions or point of view, they are defined only when you release the mouse.

Second point: still, I don't see any issue. I just see a baseboard that you can easily remove using a break.



* February 27, 2018, 02:20:11 PM
#4
See the image below. One arrow points to the floor side and the other to the wall. Both are the same color, but different shading.
When yoo cover the exposed floor with a small wall segment, the color is consistant from the railing to the basement floor, similar to what is on the upper floor.
That was what I was trying to explain.
And yes, I have read your book cover to cover, as well as the help manual.

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February 27, 2018, 02:41:06 PM
#5
I don't see any image....  ;)


* February 27, 2018, 04:06:33 PM
#6
Sory, got interupted.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2018, 04:57:51 PM by bthirsk »

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February 27, 2018, 08:06:38 PM
#7
This is a rendering effect and usually this is more evident with the white / gray colors, because the gray color is actually the white color with shadows.
Shadows and colors look different for different components, so the gray color will look different if it is applied on the Floor Cutout than the one applied on the wall or on a 3D object.
Also, in TFP, the programs apply the textures / colors in tiles from one corner to the opposite corner of each element, for this reason, the shadows of the two parts (lower and upper) may look different.

Two ideas:
1 - increase the height of the wall below the cutout.
2 - create a POB using the 3D Custom workshop Power Tool.